Courses Followed

Key Stage 3 Design and Technology

Design is not just what it looks like and feels like. Design is how it works.

- Steve Jobs

In Key stage three we aim to provide the students with a range of opportunities to work with a range of materials and techniques to give them a good range of skills and knowledge they can build on in Key stage four. The students follow a number of schemes of learning, including a light up mirror frame, pewter adornments, album design, microcontroller programming project, and a food life skills unit.

Equipment you will need:
•    Pen
•    Pencil
•    Ruler
•    Rubber
•    Colouring pencils
•    Compass
•    Fine-liner

Useful websites:
•    technologystudent.com
•    www.vam.ac.uk
•    designmuseum.org

Food Life Skills

Cookery has become a noble art, a noble science; cooks are gentlemen.

 - Robert Burton

We teach Food Life Skills to students in year 8. Our food life skills unit aims to provide the students with the skills to work in a kitchen safely and to develop an appreciation for food and for cooking. Through a series of recipes we develop basic kitchen techniques and work up to more complex recipes.

The current scheme of work includes the following recipes:
•    Grilled Sandwich
•    Vegetable cous cous
•    Cheese Scones
•    Scone-based pizza
•    Macaroni Cheese
•    Fairy Cakes

Equipment you will need:
•    A cooking apron (bring your own or available from the bursary for £4)
•    Named containers to bring your ingredients in and to take home your finished products

Useful websites:
•    bbc.co.uk/food

GCSE DT (Systems)

The true sign of intelligence is not knowledge but imagination.

- A.Einstein

You can choose to take one of the Design and Technology GCSEs as you go into year 9. The DT (systems) course uses the Edexcel specification:

Electronic Products syllabus. It consists of two units of work:
•    Unit 1 – worth 50% of the marks for the course. A two hour exam taken in the Summer term of the final year.
•    Unit 2 – worth 50% of the marks for the course. This is a design and make project based upon an exam board contextual challenge

Over the course of 3 years you will build up a knowledge base of components and electronic circuits, and learn how to apply them in a practical and design context to best solve a problem.
Year 9 aims to develop your technical knowledge and improve your skills in the workshop through various projects including: the water sensor, the steady hand game and the counter project.
Year 10 looks at taking a project from start to finish in all the detail required in the non-examined assessment (project), whilst continuing to build up your knowledge base.
Year 11 is when you complete your non-examined assessment (project) and finalise your theory knowledge in preparation for the exam.

Useful Websites:

 

GCSE DT (Polymers)

Design is where science and art break even.

- Robin Mathew

You can choose to take one of the Design and Technology GCSEs as you go into year 9. The DT Polymers course follows the GCSE Edexcel DT specification:

DT (polymers) specification. It consists of two units of work:
•    Unit 1 – worth 50% of the marks for the course. A two hour exam taken in the Summer term of the final year.
•    Unit 2 – worth 50% of the marks for the course. This is a design and make project based upon an exam board contextual challenge.

You will build up a knowledge base of materials, their properties, uses and manufacturing techniques and learn how to apply them in a practical and design context to best solve a problem.
Year 9 aims to broaden your existing knowledge and improve your skills in the workshop through various projects including: the clock project,  and a pull along toy project.
Year 10 looks at taking a project from start to finish in all the detail required in the non-examined assessment (project), whilst continuing to build up your knowledge base.
Year 11 is when you complete your non-examined assessment (project)  and finalise your theory knowledge in preparation for the exam.

Equipment you will need:
•    Pen, pencil, ruler, rubber, compass, colouring pencils, fine liner.

Useful Websites:
•     https://qualifications.pearson.com/en/qualifications/edexcel-gcses/design-and-technology-2017.html
•    bbc.co.uk/schools/gcsebitesize
•    http://www.designandtech.com/
•    JamesDysonFoundation.co.uk/
•    tep.org.uk
•    design-technology.org
•    nanotechproject.org
•    helenhudspith.com
•    sda-uk.org
•    howstuffworks.com
•    http://www.technologystudent.com/

 

AS/A2 Design and Technology: Product Design

Good design is all about making other designers feel like idiots because that idea wasn’t theirs.

 - Frank Chimero

The Pearson Edexcel Level 3 Advanced GCE in Design and Technology (Product Design) consists of one externally-examined paper and one non-examined assessment component.

Component 1: Principles of Design and Technology (Paper code: 9DT0/01)*

Written examination: 2 hours 30 minutes50% of the qualification.

Component 2: Independent Design and Make Project (Paper code: 9DT0/02)

Non-examined assessment 50% of the qualification.

Qualification aims and objectives

The aims and objectives of this qualification are to enable students to:

  • use creativity and imagination when applying iterative design processes to develop and modify designs, and to design and make prototypes that solve real world problems, considering their own and others’ needs, wants, aspirations and values
  • identify market needs and opportunities for new products, initiate and develop design solutions, and make and test prototypes
  • acquire subject knowledge in design and technology, including how a product can be developed through the stages of prototyping, realisation and commercial manufacture
  • take every opportunity to integrate and apply their understanding and knowledge from other subject areas studied during Key Stage 4, with a particular focus on science and mathematics, and those subjects they are studying alongside A Level Design and Technology
  • be open to taking design risks, showing innovation and enterprise while considering their role as responsible designers and citizens develop intellectual curiosity about the design and manufacture of products and systems, and their impact on daily life and the wider world

  • be open to taking design risks, showing innovation and enterprise while considering their role as responsible designers and citizens

  • develop intellectual curiosity about the design and manufacture of products and systems, and their impact on daily life and the wider world
  • work collaboratively to develop and refine their ideas, responding to feedback from users, peers and expert practitioners
  • gain an insight into the creative, engineering and/or manufacturing industries
  • develop the capacity to think creatively, innovatively and critically through focused research and exploration of design opportunities arising from the needs, wants and values of clients/end users
  • develop an in-depth knowledge and understanding of materials, components and processes associated with the creation of products that can be tested and evaluated in use
  • be able to make informed design decisions through an in-depth understanding of the management and development of taking a design through to a prototype
  • be able to create and analyse a design concept and use a range of skills and knowledge from other subject areas, including mathematics and science, to inform decisions in design and the application or development of technology
  • be able to work safely and skilfully to produce high-quality prototypes
  • have a critical understanding of the wider influences on design and technology, including cultural, economic, environmental, historical and social factors
  • develop the ability to draw on and apply a range of skills and knowledge from other subject areas, including the use of mathematics and science for analysis and informing decisions in design.’ (Edexcel 2017.)

Useful websites:

https://qualifications.pearson.com/en/qualifications/edexcel-a-levels/design-technology-product-design-2017.html





Sixth Form Food Club

If more of us valued food and cheer and song above hoarded gold, it would be a merrier world.

- JRR Tolkien

Sixth form food club runs on Wednesdays after school with the Leigh Morton leading the sessions. The aim is to equip sixth form students with the skills they need to take care of themselves after school, wherever they go on to. We cover as many key skills as possible, starting with simple recipes and developing them as we go on. Once they have the basic skills we encourage the students to select their own recipes and to adapt them accordingly.
Over the course of the year we also look to encourage thoughts on budgeting and planning meals over the course of a week. Portion control and nutrition play a huge part in this and are important to get right.
We aim to create a safe and creative environment where students can learn valuable life skills and have fun while doing so!

Equipment you will need:
•    A cooking apron (bring your own or available from the bursary for £4)
•    Named containers to bring your ingredients in and to take home your finished products

Useful websites:
bbc.co.uk/food
deliaonline.com